Healthy Teeth Could Equal A Healthy Body

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How often do you think about your teeth and gums? Sure, they come into your mind when you brush and floss each day, but are you valuing your oral health throughout the day? Probably not – you have more important things to think about, after all.

But revisiting just what your oral health means could change that.

Your teeth and gums don’t exist in a vacuum. In fact, your mouth is intricately linked to many other aspects of your health. For this reason, preventing dental problems like cavities and gum disease could actually help you avoid serious conditions – ranging from heart disease to stroke (more on that below).

Oral health is especially important to remember during orthodontic treatment. The additional material in the mouth is more likely to accumulate plaque, and kids can find it tough to brush and floss around their brackets and wires.

Whether your child is in braces or has finished orthodontic treatment, it’s always a good idea to reinforce the importance of oral health. Learn more about mouth-body connections below, and get in touch if you have any questions about oral hygiene during braces.

How Oral Health Impacts Whole Body Health

infographic about how oral health impacts systemic health

Staying Vigilant for Dental Problems During Braces

Braces are a time when the patient needs to be extra diligent with their oral hygiene. Like we mentioned earlier, plaque is eager to cling to brackets and wires – and it must be disrupted with brushing and flossing before it can harden.

If your child typically struggles to clean their teeth properly, make sure they have the tools they need to succeed. Brushing and flossing aids help kids with braces to get their enamel squeaky clean and plaque-free.

Preventing dental problems during braces not only helps reduce the risk of other conditions, but keeps treatment moving forward on schedule. If a patient in braces develops a cavity or other dental problem, their braces may need to be removed in order for it to be treated. This lengthens overall treatment time and pushes back the completion date.

Finally, there’s also an aesthetic component to consider. Your child’s smile after braces will be beautifully straight – but will the enamel be white and even? If decalcification occurs during treatment due to plaque buildup, that may not be the case. White spots can form on teeth from damaged enamel, leading to the need for cosmetic treatment after braces.

Looking for oral hygiene tips? Get in touch.

Naperville Orthodontist | Orthodontics Naperville | Orthodontist Naperville
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